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The Comprehension of Cloud Subjectivity

I just read an interesting paper called "A Berkeley View of Cloud Computing"

I just read an interesting paper called "A Berkeley View of Cloud Computing" and had random thought. In reading this paper, it occurred to me that the very nature of cloud computing, like the Internet itself is based on that of subjectivity or a particular subject's perspective, particularly feelings, beliefs, and desires to drive their own view point / agenda. This seems to be particularly true in the academic views of cloud computing recently.

Lately it seems that just about every "academic paper" I read on the topic of cloud computing seems to push unjustified personal opinions, in contrast to knowledge and justified facts. I can't help but think the academic realm is quickly becoming a tool to justify particular vendors market strategies rather then attempting to uncover original ideas and concepts.


Why are the most original computing concepts emerging from those who "on paper" are the least qualified? Has the Computer Science faculty at most major universities lost touch with the real world or maybe they are enslaved by their corporate benefactors, a symptom a larger problem?

On the flip side, one of the best aspects of the term cloud computing is in it's complete lack of a uniform definition thus giving us the ability to adapt the term for our own purposes. With in this nebulous definition is its true opportunity to transcend any one usage.

More broadly, cloud computing represents a new era in computing, one that is not limited by anyone school, application, methodology or business case. Or to say it another way, cloud computing represents a fundamental shift, one that will allow anyone with an Internet connection the ability to access a global cloud of opportunities previously only available to the largest companies who could afford the cost of building a global computing infrastructure. A little subjectivity of my own on a Sunday morning between diaper changes.

More Stories By Reuven Cohen

An instigator, part time provocateur, bootstrapper, amateur cloud lexicographer, and purveyor of random thoughts, 140 characters at a time.

Reuven is an early innovator in the cloud computing space as the founder of Enomaly in 2004 (Acquired by Virtustream in February 2012). Enomaly was among the first to develop a self service infrastructure as a service (IaaS) platform (ECP) circa 2005. As well as SpotCloud (2011) the first commodity style cloud computing Spot Market.

Reuven is also the co-creator of CloudCamp (100+ Cities around the Globe) CloudCamp is an unconference where early adopters of Cloud Computing technologies exchange ideas and is the largest of the ‘barcamp’ style of events.