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iVMcontrol iPhone VMware management, iTool or iToy?

iVMcontrol iPhone VMware management, iTool or iToy?

By Greg Schulz

Storage I/O trends

iVMcontrol iPhone VMware management, iTool or iToy?

A few months back I was looking for a simple easy to use yet robust tool for accessing and managing my VMware environment from my iPhone. The reason being is that I don't always like to carry a laptop or tablet around, not to mention neither fits in a pocket very well. Needless to say there are many options for accessing VMware products and implementations that run on tablets including iPads as well as laptops among others.

Why do I need iVMcontrol

I wanted something that I could quickly access and check on a VM guest, start or stop things, gain status updates if or when needed from my iPhone. Also keeping in mind that this would be a tool that would not be used constantly throughout the day, maybe at best one or twice a week, hence needed to be affordable as well. At $9.99 USD the tool I found and selected (iVMcontrol) was not for free, however I have gotten that value out of the tool already in just a few months of having it.

As mentioned, the tool is iVMcontrol which you can get from the iTunes store (here's the link).

Storage I/O IVM on iPhone
View of iVMcontrol from iPhone

Granted iVMcomtrol is not the same as other app's for full-sized tablets or laptops, however for an iPhone it's not bad! In fact other than a few nuances namely using a virtual mouse, it's pretty good for what I use it for.

That's the key is that while I use the vSphere client or vCenter Browser for real activities, iVMcontrol served a different purpose. That purpose is for example if I just need to check on something or do basic functions without having to get the laptop out or something else.  Even in the lab if I'm making a change or need to start or stop things and forget the laptop in another room, no worries simply use the iPhone.

Sure using a tablet would be easier, however I usually don't care a tablet in my pocket.

How often do I use iVMcontrol?

Depends however usually a couple of times a week depending on what I'm doing.

For example if I need to quickly check on a guest VM, start or stop something, or general status check iVMcontrol has come in handy.

Storage I/O IVM main screen
Various VMware hosts (PM's) in a VMware datacenter

Storage I/O IVM main screen
Various Guest VMs on VMware host (PM)

iVM VMware storage I/O space
VMware host storage space capacity usage

Storage I/O IVM main screen
Managing a guest VM

iVM Windows guest
Accessing Windows Guest VM via iVMcontrol

iVM Windows guest storage I/O activity
Checking on Windows Guest Storage I/O activity

As you can see the screen is small, sure you can zoom in thus good for checking in on activity, or doing basic things. However for more involved activity, that's where a tablet or regular computer comes into play accessing the VM guests, or VMware using the vSphere Client or vCenter web client type tools.

Is iVMcontrol an iTool or iToy?

IMHO its a tool, granted its also a fun toy.

Is a tool such as iVMcontrol a necessity or a nice to have for when I need to use it to check on something quick.

That depends on what you need vs. wants.

For me, it is a convince tool to have when I need it, however just because I have it does not mean I have to use it all the time.

Ok, nuff said (for now)

Cheers Gs

Greg Schulz - Author Cloud and Virtual Data Storage Networking (CRC Press), The Green and Virtual Data Center (CRC Press) and Resilient Storage Networks (Elsevier)
twitter @storageio

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More Stories By Greg Schulz

Greg Schulz is founder of the Server and StorageIO (StorageIO) Group, an IT industry analyst and consultancy firm. Greg has worked with various server operating systems along with storage and networking software tools, hardware and services. Greg has worked as a programmer, systems administrator, disaster recovery consultant, and storage and capacity planner for various IT organizations. He has worked for various vendors before joining an industry analyst firm and later forming StorageIO.

In addition to his analyst and consulting research duties, Schulz has published over a thousand articles, tips, reports and white papers and is a sought after popular speaker at events around the world. Greg is also author of the books Resilient Storage Network (Elsevier) and The Green and Virtual Data Center (CRC). His blog is at www.storageioblog.com and he can also be found on twitter @storageio.