Click here to close now.


Agile Computing Authors: Brian Daleiden, Dana Gardner, Pat Romanski, Harry Trott, Elizabeth White

News Feed Item

Child and Youth Advocacy Centre at Boost Receives Funding From Federal Government Support to Help Young Victims and Their Families

OTTAWA, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 02/14/14 -- Department of Justice Canada

Today, Minister of Justice Peter MacKay and Parliamentary Secretary Bob Dechert announced $300,000 for the implementation of the Child and Youth Advocacy Centre (CYAC) at Boost - the first CYAC in Toronto.

The funding is being made available for the CYAC at Boost to ensure that children and youth in the City of Toronto who experience abuse or violence can receive a wide range of services in a coordinated approach all in one location. The establishment of the CYAC at Boost follows the successful completion of a two-year pilot project also funded through the Department of Justice's Victims Fund. The pilot project supported the planning and development of the CYAC, which is now operational.

CYACs offer the same services as a Child Advocacy Centres (CAC), but to a broader age-range of victims. CYACs provide a safe, child and youth-friendly environment where a collaborative, coordinated team of professionals works together with an approach geared to the specific needs of each victim, to help a child or youth victim navigate the criminal justice system. The work of a CYAC or CAC multi-disciplinary team can greatly reduce the emotional and mental harm to children and youth.

Quick Facts

--  The funding will be used by the CYAC at Boost to:

    --  Establish one location as a single point of access where children,
        youth and families can receive multidisciplinary services from all
        of the professionals involved in child abuse investigations in a
        coordinated and comprehensive manner;

    --  Provide two advocates who will be central points of contact and
        support for victims and their families, ensuring that they receive
        information about their case and referrals to services as needed;

    --  Increase collaboration and strengthen partnerships with schools,
        health and community services, other local agencies and community
        organizations, and municipal, provincial and federal levels of

    --  Identify training needs and develop a training program for staff;

    --  Establish the CYAC as a Centre of Excellence that will share and
        disseminate knowledge and best practice to similar centres in
        Ontario and across the country; and,

    --  Increase public awareness about children at risk in Toronto through
        education and outreach.

--  The funding for the CYAC at Boost, is being provided by the Government
    of Canada through the Department of Justice Canada's Victims Fund. The
    Victims Fund provides support to projects and activities that encourage
    the development of new approaches, promote access to justice, improve
    the capacity of service providers, foster the establishment of referral
    networks, or increase awareness of services available to victims of
    crime and their families.

--  Since 2006, the Government of Canada has allocated more than $120
    million to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice
    system through initiatives delivered by the Department of Justice

--  This funding includes $10.25 million for new or enhanced Child Advocacy
    Centres. So far, CAC and CYAC projects have been funded in 20 cities or
    municipalities across Canada. CACs adopt a child-focused, coordinated
    and collaborative approach to addressing the needs of child and youth
    victims, and their families.


"Boost's reputation as a compassionate, effective organization speaks volumes to the important role they play in the Toronto community. The quality and dedication of the individuals who provide this service is spectacular. For more than thirty years, child and youth victims of abuse have been benefiting from the services provided by Boost. Our Government's funding and support will help Boost and its many community partners enhance their services for vulnerable young victims and their families, lessen the risk of them being re-victimized and help ensure they are more effectively heard and included in a meaningful way in our country's criminal justice system - as we've promised."

Peter MacKay, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

"Child and Youth Advocacy Centres are designed to help those most vulnerable navigate the challenges of our justice system and give them a stronger voice in how justice is carried out. By offering a range of services under one roof, the CYAC at Boost is providing much-needed assistance to victims of abuse and their families right here in the Toronto area."

Bob Dechert, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice

Related Products

--  Backgrounder: Federal Victims Strategy and Victims Fund

--  Backgrounder: Child Advocacy Centres

Associated Links

- Department of Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues

- Department of Justice Canada's Victims Fund

Follow Department of Justice Canada on Twitter (@JusticeCanadaEn), join us on Facebook or visit our YouTube channel.

Backgrounder: Federal Victims Strategy and Victims Fund

The Federal Victims Strategy was created in 2007 and made permanent by the government in 2011. The objective of the Strategy, which is led by the Department of Justice Canada, is to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice system. The Department of Justice works in close collaboration with a variety of third parties, including other federal institutions, as well as victims, victim advocates, provincial and territorial governments, service providers, and other actors involved in the criminal justice system. The Department of Justice develops policy and criminal law reform, funds various programs to meet the needs of victims of crime, explores best practices to address victims' needs, and raises awareness about the concerns of victims of crime and their role in the criminal justice system.

Within the Federal Victims Strategy, the Victims Fund is a grants and contributions program administered by the Department of Justice. Funds are available each year to provinces, territories and non-governmental organizations whose projects, activities and operations support the objectives of the Federal Victims Strategy.

The Victims Fund provides funding to projects and activities that:

--  Enhance victim assistance programs across Canada;

--  Promote access to justice and participation in the justice system and
    the development of laws, policies, and programs;

--  Promote the implementation of principles, guidelines, and laws designed
    to address the needs of victims of crime and articulate their role in
    the criminal justice system;

--  Contribute to increased knowledge and awareness of the impact of
    victimization, the needs of victims of crime, available services,
    assistance and programs, and legislation; and

--  Promote, encourage and/or enhance governmental and non-governmental
    organizations' involvement in the identification of victims' needs and
    gaps in services, as well as in the development and delivery of
    programs, services and assistance to victims, including capacity
    building within non-governmental organizations.

Since 2006, the Government of Canada has allocated more than $120 million to give victims a more effective voice in the criminal justice and corrections systems, through programs and initiatives delivered by the Department of Justice Canada. This funding includes the allocation of $10.25 million for new or enhanced Child Advocacy Centres to address the needs of child and youth victims of crime.

The Government of Canada is building on past measures to further advance the interests of victims, including:

--  Implementing legislation to double the victim surcharge and make it

--  Eliminating the faint-hope clause, which allowed murderers to obtain
    early parole; and

--  Establishing the Office of the Federal Ombudsman for Victims of Crime in

More information is available on the Department of Justice Canada's website.

Backgrounder: Child Advocacy Centres

Child Advocacy Centres (CAC) are child-focused centres that coordinate the investigation, prosecution, and treatment of child abuse while helping abused children. They adopt a seamless and collaborative approach to addressing the needs of child and youth victims of crime. CACs seek to minimize system-induced trauma by providing a child-friendly setting for a young victim and his or her family. Child and Youth Advocacy Centres (CYAC) offer the same services as a CAC, but to a broader age-range of victims.

Child Advocacy Centres bring together a multidisciplinary team of police, child protection, medical services, mental health services, and victim services. Professional services offered by CACs include coordinated forensic interviews; examination of the child by a medical professional; victim advocacy, including court preparation and support; trauma assessment; and counselling.

CACs help children and their families navigate the justice system in a number of ways. For example, CACs provide a child or youth with a safe and comfortable environment in which to be interviewed by criminal justice professionals and seek to reduce the number of interviews and questions directed at a child, thereby minimizing system-induced trauma. CACs may also provide education and training to justice professionals on best practices for interviewing child victims and witnesses. For example, interviews recorded by video are an effective method for gathering valuable information that can help both the young victim and the justice system. Ultimately, CACs lead to better communication between agencies supporting young victims and to increased access to services for young victims and their families or caregivers.

It has been shown that investigations conducted by CACs are cost-effective and can expedite decision making by Crown prosecutors laying criminal charges. Parents whose children receive services from CACs are more satisfied with the investigation process and interview procedures, and those children who attend CACs are generally satisfied with the investigation and are more likely to state they were not scared during the forensic interviewing process.

Since 2010, the Government of Canada has allocated $10.25 million for new or enhanced Child Advocacy Centres to address the needs of child and youth victims of crime. CACs that have benefited from Government of Canada funding, either directly or through funding provided to one of their partners, include the following:

Nova Scotia

Halifax (Child and Youth Advocacy Centre Demonstration Project)


Centre d'expertise Marie-Vincent, Montreal


Child and Youth Advocacy Centre at Boost, Toronto

Child Advocacy Centre Niagara, St. Catharines


Winnipeg Children's Advocacy Centre, Winnipeg


Saskatoon Centre for Children's Justice, Saskatoon

Regina Children's Justice Centre, Regina


Caribou Child and Youth Advocacy Centre, Grand Prairie

Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, Calgary

British Columbia

Sophie's Place, Surrey

Alisa's Wish, Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows

The Government has also provided funding for projects that explore the creation or development of a CAC in the following communities:



Cornwall, Stormont, Dundas, Glengarry, and Akwesasne




Sioux Lookout

British Columbia


West Kootenay Boundary





Northwest Territories


Paloma Aguilar
Press Secretary
Office of the Minister of Justice

Media Relations Office
Department of Justice

More Stories By Marketwired .

Copyright © 2009 Marketwired. All rights reserved. All the news releases provided by Marketwired are copyrighted. Any forms of copying other than an individual user's personal reference without express written permission is prohibited. Further distribution of these materials is strictly forbidden, including but not limited to, posting, emailing, faxing, archiving in a public database, redistributing via a computer network or in a printed form.

@ThingsExpo Stories
Container technology is shaping the future of DevOps and it’s also changing the way organizations think about application development. With the rise of mobile applications in the enterprise, businesses are abandoning year-long development cycles and embracing technologies that enable rapid development and continuous deployment of apps. In his session at DevOps Summit, Kurt Collins, Developer Evangelist at, examined how Docker has evolved into a highly effective tool for application delivery by allowing increasingly popular Mobile Backend-as-a-Service (mBaaS) platforms to quickly crea...
Cloud computing delivers on-demand resources that provide businesses with flexibility and cost-savings. The challenge in moving workloads to the cloud has been the cost and complexity of ensuring the initial and ongoing security and regulatory (PCI, HIPAA, FFIEC) compliance across private and public clouds. Manual security compliance is slow, prone to human error, and represents over 50% of the cost of managing cloud applications. Determining how to automate cloud security compliance is critical to maintaining positive ROI. Raxak Protect is an automated security compliance SaaS platform and ma...
The cloud. Like a comic book superhero, there seems to be no problem it can’t fix or cost it can’t slash. Yet making the transition is not always easy and production environments are still largely on premise. Taking some practical and sensible steps to reduce risk can also help provide a basis for a successful cloud transition. A plethora of surveys from the likes of IDG and Gartner show that more than 70 percent of enterprises have deployed at least one or more cloud application or workload. Yet a closer inspection at the data reveals less than half of these cloud projects involve production...
Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place June 7-9, 2016 at Javits Center, New York City and Nov 1-3, 2016, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with the 18th International @CloudExpo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world and ThingsExpo New York Call for Papers is now open.
With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo 2016 in New York and Silicon Valley. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be! Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with 17th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound cha...
We are rapidly moving to a brave new world of interconnected smart homes, cars, offices and factories known as the Internet of Things (IoT). Sensors and monitoring devices will touch every part of our lives. Let's take a closer look at the Internet of Things. The Internet of Things is a worldwide network of objects and devices connected to the Internet. They are electronics, sensors, software and more. These objects connect to the Internet and can be controlled remotely via apps and programs. Because they can be accessed via the Internet, these devices create a tremendous opportunity to inte...
Today air travel is a minefield of delays, hassles and customer disappointment. Airlines struggle to revitalize the experience. GE and M2Mi will demonstrate practical examples of how IoT solutions are helping airlines bring back personalization, reduce trip time and improve reliability. In their session at @ThingsExpo, Shyam Varan Nath, Principal Architect with GE, and Dr. Sarah Cooper, M2Mi’s VP Business Development and Engineering, explored the IoT cloud-based platform technologies driving this change including privacy controls, data transparency and integration of real time context with p...
We all know that data growth is exploding and storage budgets are shrinking. Instead of showing you charts on about how much data there is, in his General Session at 17th Cloud Expo, Scott Cleland, Senior Director of Product Marketing at HGST, showed how to capture all of your data in one place. After you have your data under control, you can then analyze it in one place, saving time and resources.
The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing rapidly by extending current technologies, products and networks. By 2020, Cisco estimates there will be 50 billion connected devices. Gartner has forecast revenues of over $300 billion, just to IoT suppliers. Now is the time to figure out how you’ll make money – not just create innovative products. With hundreds of new products and companies jumping into the IoT fray every month, there’s no shortage of innovation. Despite this, McKinsey/VisionMobile data shows "less than 10 percent of IoT developers are making enough to support a reasonably sized team....
Just over a week ago I received a long and loud sustained applause for a presentation I delivered at this year’s Cloud Expo in Santa Clara. I was extremely pleased with the turnout and had some very good conversations with many of the attendees. Over the next few days I had many more meaningful conversations and was not only happy with the results but also learned a few new things. Here is everything I learned in those three days distilled into three short points.
DevOps is about increasing efficiency, but nothing is more inefficient than building the same application twice. However, this is a routine occurrence with enterprise applications that need both a rich desktop web interface and strong mobile support. With recent technological advances from Isomorphic Software and others, rich desktop and tuned mobile experiences can now be created with a single codebase – without compromising functionality, performance or usability. In his session at DevOps Summit, Charles Kendrick, CTO and Chief Architect at Isomorphic Software, demonstrated examples of com...
As organizations realize the scope of the Internet of Things, gaining key insights from Big Data, through the use of advanced analytics, becomes crucial. However, IoT also creates the need for petabyte scale storage of data from millions of devices. A new type of Storage is required which seamlessly integrates robust data analytics with massive scale. These storage systems will act as “smart systems” provide in-place analytics that speed discovery and enable businesses to quickly derive meaningful and actionable insights. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Paul Turner, Chief Marketing Officer at...
In his keynote at @ThingsExpo, Chris Matthieu, Director of IoT Engineering at Citrix and co-founder and CTO of Octoblu, focused on building an IoT platform and company. He provided a behind-the-scenes look at Octoblu’s platform, business, and pivots along the way (including the Citrix acquisition of Octoblu).
In his General Session at 17th Cloud Expo, Bruce Swann, Senior Product Marketing Manager for Adobe Campaign, explored the key ingredients of cross-channel marketing in a digital world. Learn how the Adobe Marketing Cloud can help marketers embrace opportunities for personalized, relevant and real-time customer engagement across offline (direct mail, point of sale, call center) and digital (email, website, SMS, mobile apps, social networks, connected objects).
The Internet of Everything is re-shaping technology trends–moving away from “request/response” architecture to an “always-on” Streaming Web where data is in constant motion and secure, reliable communication is an absolute necessity. As more and more THINGS go online, the challenges that developers will need to address will only increase exponentially. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Todd Greene, Founder & CEO of PubNub, exploreed the current state of IoT connectivity and review key trends and technology requirements that will drive the Internet of Things from hype to reality.
Two weeks ago (November 3-5), I attended the Cloud Expo Silicon Valley as a speaker, where I presented on the security and privacy due diligence requirements for cloud solutions. Cloud security is a topical issue for every CIO, CISO, and technology buyer. Decision-makers are always looking for insights on how to mitigate the security risks of implementing and using cloud solutions. Based on the presentation topics covered at the conference, as well as the general discussions heard between sessions, I wanted to share some of my observations on emerging trends. As cyber security serves as a fou...
Continuous processes around the development and deployment of applications are both impacted by -- and a benefit to -- the Internet of Things trend. To help better understand the relationship between DevOps and a plethora of new end-devices and data please welcome Gary Gruver, consultant, author and a former IT executive who has led many large-scale IT transformation projects, and John Jeremiah, Technology Evangelist at Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), on Twitter at @j_jeremiah. The discussion is moderated by me, Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions.
Too often with compelling new technologies market participants become overly enamored with that attractiveness of the technology and neglect underlying business drivers. This tendency, what some call the “newest shiny object syndrome” is understandable given that virtually all of us are heavily engaged in technology. But it is also mistaken. Without concrete business cases driving its deployment, IoT, like many other technologies before it, will fade into obscurity.
With all the incredible momentum behind the Internet of Things (IoT) industry, it is easy to forget that not a single CEO wakes up and wonders if “my IoT is broken.” What they wonder is if they are making the right decisions to do all they can to increase revenue, decrease costs, and improve customer experience – effectively the same challenges they have always had in growing their business. The exciting thing about the IoT industry is now these decisions can be better, faster, and smarter. Now all corporate assets – people, objects, and spaces – can share information about themselves and thei...
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound effect on the world, and what should we expect to see over the next couple of years.