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FirstEnergy Announces Leadership Changes in Generation Group

AKRON, Ohio, Jan. 3, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE) today announced that Fred von Ahn, formerly vice president, North Fleet Operations, for its FirstEnergy Generation Corp. subsidiary, has been promoted, effective January 1, 2013, to vice president, Central Fleet Operations.  Von Ahn succeeds Frank Lubich, who has elected to retire after more than 35 years with the company. 

Joining the company in 1998, von Ahn was a lead engineer at the Perry Nuclear Power Plant, in Perry, Ohio, before being promoted to director, Nuclear Engineering, at the company's Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Station in Shippingport, Pa.  In 2003, he was named vice president of Oversight, FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC) prior to being promoted to director, Site Operations, at Perry.  In 2006, he was named director, Fleet Operations Support, FENOC, and the following year von Ahn became director, Fossil Operations Support.  In 2009, he was named director, Bruce Mansfield Plant, in Shippingport, Pa., and was promoted to vice president, North Fleet Operations, in 2011.  He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy.

"Fred has been a vital member of our management team for many years and has helped us manage a variety of challenges, particularly in how we operate our fleet in accordance with new U. S. Environmental Protection Agency rules," said FirstEnergy Generation President James H. Lash.  "With his experience on both the fossil and nuclear side of our business, Fred will continue the strong leadership we have had over the years at our Central Fleet Operations, which includes some of our most valuable generating assets."

Lubich joined the company in 1977 as an associate engineer at the R.E. Burger Plant in Shadyside, Ohio.  In 1985, he moved to the W.H. Sammis Plant as operations supervisor and ultimately was named plant director, then plant vice president.  In 2008, Lubich was named vice president, Fossil Operations and to his current position in 2011.  He has been on a temporary assignment in the Fuels group at FirstEnergy Solutions to help further integrate plant operations with the company's fuel and dispatching strategy.

"We'll miss Frank's leadership, knowledge and experience," said Lash.  "He is a true professional and knows the fossil generation business as well as anyone.  Frank is well respected by his peers and employees at the plants, and when faced with challenges he always responded with strong leadership and a dedication to safe, reliable plant operations."

FirstEnergy Generation's Central Fleet includes the W.H. Sammis Plant in Stratton, Ohio, the Bruce Mansfield Plant in Shippingport, Pa., and Pleasants Power Station in Belmont, W. Va.  The North Fleet is comprised mostly of plants FirstEnergy is in the process of deactivating due to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rules.

FirstEnergy is a diversified energy company dedicated to safety, reliability and operational excellence.  Its 10 electric distribution companies form one of the nation's largest investor-owned electric systems, serving customers in Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and West Virginia.  Its generation subsidiaries control more than 20,000 megawatts of capacity from a diversified mix of scrubbed coal, non-emitting nuclear, natural gas, hydro, pumped-storage hydro and other renewables.  Follow FirstEnergy on Twitter @FirstEnergyCorp.

Forward-Looking Statements: This news release includes forward-looking statements based on information currently available to management. Such statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties. These statements include declarations regarding management's intents, beliefs and current expectations. These statements typically contain, but are not limited to, the terms "anticipate," "potential," "expect," "believe," "estimate" and similar words. Forward-looking statements involve estimates, assumptions, known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Actual results may differ materially due to: the speed and nature of increased competition in the electric utility industry, the impact of the regulatory process on the pending matters before FERC and in the various states in which we do business including, but not limited to, matters related to rates, the uncertainties of various cost recovery and cost allocation issues resulting from ATSI's realignment into PJM, economic or weather conditions affecting future sales and margins, changing energy, capacity and commodity market prices and availability, financial derivative reforms that could increase our liquidity needs and collateral costs, the continued ability of our regulated utilities to collect transition and other costs, operation and maintenance costs being higher than anticipated, other legislative and regulatory changes, and revised environmental requirements, including possible GHG emission, water intake and coal combustion residual regulations, the potential impacts of CAIR, and any laws, rules or regulations that ultimately replace CAIR, and the effects of the EPA's MATS rules, the uncertainty of the timing and amounts of the capital expenditures that may arise in connection with any litigation, including NSR litigation or potential regulatory initiatives or rulemakings (including that such expenditures could result in our decision to deactivate or idle certain generating units), the uncertainties associated with our plans to deactivate our older unscrubbed regulated and competitive fossil units and our plans to change the operations of certain fossil plants, including the impact on vendor commitments, and the timing of those deactivations and operational changes as they relate to, among other things, the RMR arrangements and the reliability of the transmission grid, issues that could result from the NRC's review of the indications of cracking in the Davis Besse Plant shield building, adverse regulatory or legal decisions and outcomes with respect to our nuclear operations (including, but not limited to the revocation or non-renewal of necessary licenses, approvals or operating permits by the NRC or as a result of the incident at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant), adverse legal decisions and outcomes related to ME's and PN's ability to recover certain transmission costs through their transmission service charge riders, the continuing availability of generating units, changes in their operational status and any related impacts on vendor commitments, replacement power costs being higher than anticipated or inadequately hedged, the ability to comply with applicable state and federal reliability standards and energy efficiency mandates, changes in customers' demand for power, including but not limited to, changes resulting from the implementation of state and federal energy efficiency mandates, the ability to accomplish or realize anticipated benefits from strategic goals, our ability to improve electric commodity margins and the impact of, among other factors, the increased cost of fuel and fuel transportation on such margins, the ability to experience growth in the Regulated Distribution and Competitive Energy Services segments, changing market conditions that could affect the measurement of liabilities and the value of assets held in our NDTs, pension trusts and other trust funds, and cause us and our subsidiaries to make additional contributions sooner, or in amounts that are larger than currently anticipated, the impact of changes to material accounting policies, the ability to access the public securities and other capital and credit markets in accordance with our financing plans, the cost of such capital and overall condition of the capital and credit markets affecting us and our subsidiaries, changes in general economic conditions affecting us and our subsidiaries, interest rates and any actions taken by credit rating agencies that could negatively affect us and our subsidiaries' access to financing, increased costs thereof, and increase requirements to post additional collateral to support outstanding commodity positions, LOCs and other financial guarantees, the state of the national and regional economy and its impact on our major industrial and commercial customers, issues concerning the soundness of domestic and foreign financial institutions and counterparties with which we do business, the risks and other factors discussed from time to time in our SEC filings, and other similar factors. The foregoing review of factors should not be construed as exhaustive. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for management to predict all such factors, nor assess the impact of any such factor on FirstEnergy's business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements. FirstEnergy expressly disclaims any current intention to update, except as required by law, any forward-looking statements contained herein as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

www.firstenergycorp.com

SOURCE FirstEnergy Corp.

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