Welcome!

Web 2.0 Authors: Roger Strukhoff, Bob Gourley

Related Topics: Wireless, XML, SOA & WOA, AJAX & REA, Web 2.0, iPhone, Apache

Wireless: Article

Mobile Carriers and LTE: Top Five Industry Predictions for 2013

Vitesse Predicts Top 5 Mobile Industry Trends for 2013

Carrier LTE deployments will double to create 200+ commercial LTE networks:

As more and more consumers buy devices with LTE capabilities, the demand for LTE services is increasing and carriers will need to invest in their radio access networks. Today's LTE networks are focused on providing basic coverage for LTE devices, but can't support a large number of LTE devices on the network. In 2013, there will be a growing emphasis on moving towards increasing both coverage and capacity of LTE networks with the corresponding infrastructure investments. TD-LTE will also see more acceptance and trials, as it reduces carrier costs and requires fewer spectrum licenses.

Data and video surges cause a shift from a single class of service to multiple classes of service in the backhaul network:

In 2013, we'll see a shift from a single class of service to multiple classes of service to address the demands of the end-users and maximize profitability for backhaul operators by avoiding costly over-builds. Currently all traffic on a network goes through a single pipe whether it be video or audio. With multiple classes of service, mobile operators will better be able to handle the unprecedented growth of data and achieve significant savings by only delivering services users pay for. Multiple classes of service also enable service providers to allocate network resources for services that matter, rather than providing a "dumb pipe" for all traffic and at all times. Customers, as well as content providers, are willing to pay for those differentiated services.

Carriers finally trial small cell deployments:

There is a lot of buzz around small cells and how they will be instrumental in LTE network rollouts. 2013 will be the main trial year for carriers in outdoor small cell deployment, with carriers increasing RFQs for small cell equipment and their backhaul networks. As outdoor small cells will primarily be deployed on lamp posts and traffic signs in addition to the outside of buildings, they will require connectivity besides fiber. 80% of small cell backhaul will be over microwave or millimeter-wave links. Additionally, more than half of the growth in small cells will come from the APAC region.

Carriers and OEMs implement IEEE1588v2-based timing on a large scale:

Radio networks require very precise timing in order to work. Until now, carriers have been focused on how to move their backhaul traffic to packet-based networks. In 2013, these packet networks will enter the next stage, where carriers are moving to their timing packet-based as well and the IEEE 1588v2 Precision Time Protocol will be the de-facto standard. Overall we'll see a shift from awareness to actual implementation and deployment. There will be a concerted effort in the industry to define a standard mechanism for accurate time-of-day and phase delivery for LTE and LTE-Advanced networks based on IEEE 1588v2 technology.

Carriers figure out a way to provide value added services to businesses over cloud:

Most business services in the past were primarily about delivering a pipe for transferring data between enterprise locations. But with enterprise (IT) services increasingly moving to the cloud, the demand for Ethernet business service is surging. 2013 will be the year when carriers figure out how to make money off of their networks by securely connecting customers to public and private clouds, and helping enterprise customers manage networks and infrastructure, increased use of mobile devices and a more mobile workforce in general. This will allow carriers to provide additional revenue generating services to their business customers, manage service level agreements, and be able to charge for different levels of service, and services that can change based on time-of-day.

Author: Martin Nuss

Martin Nuss is the Vice President of Technology and Strategy and Chief Technology Officer for Vitesse. Martin has more than 20 years of technical and management experience and holds a doctorate in applied physics. Vitesse designs a diverse portfolio of high-performance semiconductor solutions for Carrier and Enterprise networks worldwide. Vitesse products enable the fastest-growing network infrastructure markets including Mobile Access/IP Edge, Cloud Computing and SMB/SME Enterprise Networking.

Via Broadband Convergent

More Stories By Leonard Grace

Leonard Grace is the founder of Broadband Convergent, an industry leader tech news and analysis for Broadband, Cable, Mobile, Wireless, and Telecom markets providing strategic direction, business trending, sprinkled with lots of opinion. Technology executives must focus on key business indicators with fast, effective and researched analytics to provide leading edge decisions that propel their organizations ahead of the competition. Broadband Convergent researches the latest trends, strategy, and analysis to deliver the results executives and managers depend on to make strategic business decisions. Whether it is (to-market-strategy), the latest competitive advantage, leading edge technology or legislative updates; Broadband Convergent is on top of intelligence gathering and reporting to make industry leaders comfortable with making decisions based on our findings. Our company is a leader in providing fast, efficient, and economical insights into competitive markets, business strategies, market trends and the future outlook of the legislative landscape. Leonard has produced 250+ highly researched articles providing a unique perspective on current Broadband issues including Cable, Mobile, Wireless and Telecom sectors. His insights dig down to find the why’s and why-not’s of industry decisions and how those effect the commerce of broadband.