Welcome!

Agile Computing Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Andy Thurai

Blog Feed Post

Time for an App Audit

Best security practice often tells you to limit your attack surface to the bare minimum, which means you need to be aware of what that surface looks like. When it comes to our social networks though, we tend to ignore exactly how exposed we can be as we share all sorts of information with the world.

One of these areas that has slipped through my attention, and probably yours as well, is the number of apps you have allowed access to your Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn accounts. The answer is probably more than you think. It took a security message from Twitter last week to have me investigate the situation, and it wasn’t pretty.

Now granted, I test a lot of apps for a living and chances are that I have actually used each of the ones that I have authorized to my accounts. But I was surprised that I had more than 100 apps that could access my Twitter and Facebook account, and 70 on LinkedIn. Many of them I couldn’t even recall what they did, given that I probably used each one once, found out that it wasn’t up to snuff, and moved on to testing something else out. But I never actually revoked access from my account for any of these apps since I added them.

So let’s take some time now to clean things up and eliminate the apps that you no longer use or find relevant to your social networking way of life. Here are the links to the various places that will allow you to peruse your app access:

https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=applications

https://twitter.com/settings/applications

https://www.linkedin.com/secure/settings?userAgree=&goback=.nas_*1_*1_*1

LinkedIn has the easiest of the three to eliminate unknown or uninteresting apps: you just go down the list and check off the ones you want to remove. There are actually two sections for the LinkedIn page: the actual apps that typically display something on your main LinkedIn profile page or interact with content (such as Slideshare presentations or blog posts) that appear on your profile, and links to external websites. The former you can investigate further. The latter you don’t really have any hot link or any information about the external site, which is somewhat lacking. Each of the actual apps has really only one possible setting to adjust: whether you display the app on your profile or your LinkedIn homepage. You have to click on the “about” link to make this adjustment, however.

With Twitter and Facebook you have to revoke access to each app one by one. Facebook actually has done some good work here (despite their reputation for whoring your privacy data). For each app, it has the helpful but eventually annoying message that even if you revoke access, there is probably some residual data that is lurking on the app’s own data center that you will have to spend lots of energy to try to remove completely. It also allows you to edit the specific access that each app has to your account: it tells you what data the app collects from you, who has access to this information on your timeline, and when it last accessed your information. That is all very useful, but somewhat time consuming if you are really serious about revoking access.

Twitter has the least information available for each app, and just a binary decision: allow or revoke. Each app is shown with the level of access to your account: read, write or sending direct messages. You can’t adjust these once you have approved the app.

So take a few moments now and clean up your apps! Your account will be safer, and you will feel better about reviewing your connected life.


Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By David Strom

David Strom is an international authority on network and Internet technologies. He has written extensively on the topic for 20 years for a wide variety of print publications and websites, such as The New York Times, TechTarget.com, PC Week/eWeek, Internet.com, Network World, Infoworld, Computerworld, Small Business Computing, Communications Week, Windows Sources, c|net and news.com, Web Review, Tom's Hardware, EETimes, and many others.

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the...
SYS-CON Events announced today that IoT Global Network has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's @ThingsExpo, which will take place on June 6–8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. The IoT Global Network is a platform where you can connect with industry experts and network across the IoT community to build the successful IoT business of the future.
Poor data quality and analytics drive down business value. In fact, Gartner estimated that the average financial impact of poor data quality on organizations is $9.7 million per year. But bad data is much more than a cost center. By eroding trust in information, analytics and the business decisions based on these, it is a serious impediment to digital transformation.
To Really Work for Enterprises, MultiCloud Adoption Requires Far Better and Inclusive Cloud Monitoring and Cost Management … But How? Overwhelmingly, even as enterprises have adopted cloud computing and are expanding to multi-cloud computing, IT leaders remain concerned about how to monitor, manage and control costs across hybrid and multi-cloud deployments. It’s clear that traditional IT monitoring and management approaches, designed after all for on-premises data centers, are falling short in ...
Machine learning has taken residence at our cities' cores and now we can finally have "smart cities." Cities are a collection of buildings made to provide the structure and safety necessary for people to function, create and survive. Buildings are a pool of ever-changing performance data from large automated systems such as heating and cooling to the people that live and work within them. Through machine learning, buildings can optimize performance, reduce costs, and improve occupant comfort by ...
The best way to leverage your Cloud Expo presence as a sponsor and exhibitor is to plan your news announcements around our events. The press covering Cloud Expo and @ThingsExpo will have access to these releases and will amplify your news announcements. More than two dozen Cloud companies either set deals at our shows or have announced their mergers and acquisitions at Cloud Expo. Product announcements during our show provide your company with the most reach through our targeted audiences.
CloudEXPO New York 2018, colocated with DXWorldEXPO New York 2018 will be held November 11-13, 2018, in New York City and will bring together Cloud Computing, FinTech and Blockchain, Digital Transformation, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps, AI, Machine Learning and WebRTC to one location.
Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settlement products to hedge funds and investment banks. After, he co-founded a revenue cycle management company where he learned about Bitcoin and eventually Ethereal. Andrew's role at ConsenSys Enterprise is a mul...
DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO are the world's most influential, independent events where Cloud Computing was coined and where technology buyers and vendors meet to experience and discuss the big picture of Digital Transformation and all of the strategies, tactics, and tools they need to realize their goals. Sponsors of DXWorldEXPO | CloudEXPO benefit from unmatched branding, profile building and lead generation opportunities.
Disruption, Innovation, Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, Leadership and Management hear these words all day every day... lofty goals but how do we make it real? Add to that, that simply put, people don't like change. But what if we could implement and utilize these enterprise tools in a fast and "Non-Disruptive" way, enabling us to glean insights about our business, identify and reduce exposure, risk and liability, and secure business continuity?