Click here to close now.

Welcome!

Agile Computing Authors: Jnan Dash, Larry Dragich, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, Wayne Lam

Related Topics: @CloudExpo Blog, Government Cloud

@CloudExpo Blog: Article

US Gov't Embraces “Cloud-First” Policy

Plans 40% Cut in Data Center Footprint by 2015

The Whitehouse Office of Management and Budget has announced that, from now on, cloud computing would be the "default approach to IT" for US government agencies.  The move comes as an element of a sweeping set of government IT reforms begun last summer intended to "close the IT gap" between the public and private sectors.  The cloud-first policy is expected to reduce a 2000+ data center infrastructure by as much as 40%, lowering costs, improving security and performance, and speeding up the deployment of new applications.

Closing the "IT Gap"

Last June, writing on the OMB web site, then-Director Peter Orszag made this observation:

"When many of my colleagues went from the cutting-edge, social media-focused Obama presidential campaign into the federal government, they remarked that it was like going from an X-box to an Atari.

"Indeed, a significant IT gap has developed over the past decade and a half between the public and private sectors - and that is a big part of the productivity divide between the two. Closing this IT gap is key to boost efficiency and make government more open and responsive to the wants and needs of the public."

It was the Obama administration's opening salvo in a war on manifold cost overruns, schedule delays, and outright failures in IT projects across dozens of federal agencies.  Since then, the OMB has formulated and started executing on a tripartite IT reform strategy, in which cloud computing plays an important role.

The first part of the strategy was the execution of an in-depth review of the highest priority IT modernization projects that were not yet delivered, "resulting in faster deliverables, terminations of projects that didn't work, and most importantly turned around projects that were in trouble," according to the OMB.  The second was a review of 30 financial systems projects across 20 different agencies with an aggregate budget of $20b, resulting in fully half of them being altered, reduced, or eliminated entirely.

"All In" on the Cloud

The third part of the IT reform strategy aims to substantially alter the way the US government spends its $80b annual IT budget going forward by adopting the "light technologies and shared solutions" of cloud computing, starting with the 2012 budget cycle.

In a speech last week before the Northern Virginia Technology Council, the OMB's deputy management director and chief performance officer, Jeff Zients laid out some of the particulars of the cloud-first strategy.

"What this means is that going forward, when evaluating options for new IT deployments, OMB will require that agencies default to cloud-based solutions whenever a secure, reliable, cost-effective cloud option exists," Zients said, adding, "These platforms will allow agencies to easily adopt cloud solutions for systems, such as infrastructure, email, and productivity suites."

He also said that the OMB will help this initiative along by setting up secure, government-wide cloud computing infrastructure that will serve the needs of multiple agencies and result in the closing of as many as 800 data centers in the next five years.

This is great news for cloud computing for a number of reasons.

Cloud Validation

When an ultra-conservative customer like the US federal government embraces a new technology so whole-heartedly, it goes a long way to dispelling the enterprise CIOs' concerns about security and other issues that have been retarding cloud computing adoption in the high end of the commercial market.

Democratized Procurement

Furthermore, the cloud-first announcement included a declaration that the government would be "increasing budget flexibility and speeding up [technology] acquisitions."  This will almost certainly translate into smaller, pure-play cloud startups being considered for inclusion in new project procurements in a way that companies of their size never were before.

Increased Vendor Profit Margins

Finally and most notably, although the federal government aims to reduce its IT cost through its use of cloud computing, which means a corresponding reduction in the IT vendors' collective top line, the cloud-first initiative could actually improve their bottom line on federal sales.

In general, today, doing business with the federal government is not a high margin endeavor.  Where the average profit of S&P 500 companies overall is about 8.5%, most government contractors make only about five percent.  And, although highly specialized IT systems can individually earn above-average margins, the overall average for software systems sold to the federal government is about 8%, versus 12-16% for similar systems sold to commercial clients.

There are two main reasons why federal IT sales are less profitable than their commercial counterparts, and both of them stand to be potentially mitigated by the cloud-first initiative.

The first reason hardware and, to a lesser extent, software vendors make less profit on federal contracts is the typical government agency's enormous buying power.  Whether it is servers, switches or seats, huge agencies buy huge amounts of everything, and are so able to negotiate the lowest possible unit price on each thing they buy.

The economics and technology of cloud computing say that where an agency might have bought, say, ten separate server boxes to run dedicated application instances before, they will now buy a single box to run ten virtual servers now.  So, while the overall revenue might go down, the margin per megabyte or MIPS will go up.

The second reason for lower federal profit margins made by software and, to a lesser extent, hardware vendors is the attenuating effect on project schedules and budgets of excessive bureaucracy, shifting priorities, and even less wholesome factors like fraud and incompetence, coupled with a procurement process that makes it nearly impossible for vendors to be properly compensated for the time and money they lose because of those things.

There are multiple provisions accompanying the cloud-first initiative that should a long way to reducing and eliminating the various kinds of government waste that currently diminish vendor profits.   One is that the OMB is creating a new formal, government-wide career track for professional program management and will only approve IT projects with effective program management teams "hardwired into the agency's organizational structure."  Another is that they plan to streamline governance and increase accountability by "bringing senior executives to the table armed with the right information and expertise to provide meaningful oversight and drive interventions and decision making on specific projects."

In short, government cloud computing could be a much more profitable line of business than its predecessor.

Catch-Up or Leap-Frog?

Mr. Zients summed up the OMB's IT reform drive, of which the cloud-first initiative is such a large part, like this:

"Tackling the information technology gap between the public and private sectors is one of most effective ways we can make government work more effectively and efficiently for the American people. IT has been at the center of the private sector's productivity gains, but for too long Federal IT projects have run over budget, behind schedule, or failed to deliver what [sic] on their promise. That's why fixing IT is a cornerstone of the President's Accountable Government initiative."

That statement makes it sound like the government thinks it is trying to catch up to the enterprise, but, with regard to cloud computing in particular, one has to wonder if they really understand the magnitude of their goal.

While the OMB intends to use cloud computing to enable shutting down 800 data centers in a few years, most large commercial enterprises are still just taking baby steps, dragging their feet, or digging in their heels with regards to the cloud, and very few are attempting anything nearly as ambitious as the OMB plan.

The US government takes a lot of heat and engenders a lot of cynicism from its citizenry, and much of it is certainly deserved.  But, regardless of our individual politics, we each can probably think of at least a few things the government has done that to us represent startling achievements that we can't help but admire and hope will be further pursued in the wider commercial world, like space exploration or disease prevention.

Two weeks ago, I never would have guessed that cloud computing might be one such thing.

More Stories By Tim Negris

Tim Negris is SVP, Marketing & Sales at Yottamine Analytics, a pioneering Big Data machine learning software company. He occasionally authors software industry news analysis and insights on Ulitzer.com, is a 25-year technology industry veteran with expertise in software development, database, networking, social media, cloud computing, mobile apps, analytics, and other enabling technologies.

He is recognized for ability to rapidly translate complex technical information and concepts into compelling, actionable knowledge. He is also widely credited with coining the term and co-developing the concept of the “Thin Client” computing model while working for Larry Ellison in the early days of Oracle.

Tim has also held a variety of executive and consulting roles in a numerous start-ups, and several established companies, including Sybase, Oracle, HP, Dell, and IBM. He is a frequent contributor to a number of publications and sites, focusing on technologies and their applications, and has written a number of advanced software applications for social media, video streaming, and music education.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


@ThingsExpo Stories
Today air travel is a minefield of delays, hassles and customer disappointment. Airlines struggle to revitalize the experience. GE and M2Mi will demonstrate practical examples of how IoT solutions are helping airlines bring back personalization, reduce trip time and improve reliability. In their session at @ThingsExpo, Shyam Varan Nath, Principal Architect with GE, and Dr. Sarah Cooper, M2Mi’s VP Business Development and Engineering, will explore the IoT cloud-based platform technologies driving this change including privacy controls, data transparency and integration of real time context wi...
It is one thing to build single industrial IoT applications, but what will it take to build the Smart Cities and truly society-changing applications of the future? The technology won’t be the problem, it will be the number of parties that need to work together and be aligned in their motivation to succeed. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jason Mondanaro, Director, Product Management at Metanga, discussed how you can plan to cooperate, partner, and form lasting all-star teams to change the world and it starts with business models and monetization strategies.
Internet of Things is moving from being a hype to a reality. Experts estimate that internet connected cars will grow to 152 million, while over 100 million internet connected wireless light bulbs and lamps will be operational by 2020. These and many other intriguing statistics highlight the importance of Internet powered devices and how market penetration is going to multiply many times over in the next few years.
Internet of Things (IoT) will be a hybrid ecosystem of diverse devices and sensors collaborating with operational and enterprise systems to create the next big application. In their session at @ThingsExpo, Bramh Gupta, founder and CEO of robomq.io, and Fred Yatzeck, principal architect leading product development at robomq.io, discussed how choosing the right middleware and integration strategy from the get-go will enable IoT solution developers to adapt and grow with the industry, while at the same time reduce Time to Market (TTM) by using plug and play capabilities offered by a robust IoT ...
To many people, IoT is a buzzword whose value is not understood. Many people think IoT is all about wearables and home automation. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Mike Kavis, Vice President & Principal Cloud Architect at Cloud Technology Partners, discussed some incredible game-changing use cases and how they are transforming industries like agriculture, manufacturing, health care, and smart cities. He will discuss cool technologies like smart dust, robotics, smart labels, and much more. Prepare to be blown away with a glimpse of the future.
The Internet of Things is not only adding billions of sensors and billions of terabytes to the Internet. It is also forcing a fundamental change in the way we envision Information Technology. For the first time, more data is being created by devices at the edge of the Internet rather than from centralized systems. What does this mean for today's IT professional? In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists addressed this very serious issue of profound change in the industry.
SYS-CON Events announced today that BMC will exhibit at SYS-CON's 16th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. BMC delivers software solutions that help IT transform digital enterprises for the ultimate competitive business advantage. BMC has worked with thousands of leading companies to create and deliver powerful IT management services. From mainframe to cloud to mobile, BMC pairs high-speed digital innovation with robust IT industrialization – allowing customers to provide amazing user experiences with optimized IT per...
There will be 150 billion connected devices by 2020. New digital businesses have already disrupted value chains across every industry. APIs are at the center of the digital business. You need to understand what assets you have that can be exposed digitally, what their digital value chain is, and how to create an effective business model around that value chain to compete in this economy. No enterprise can be complacent and not engage in the digital economy. Learn how to be the disruptor and not the disruptee.
The Internet of Things is not only adding billions of sensors and billions of terabytes to the Internet. It is also forcing a fundamental change in the way we envision Information Technology. For the first time, more data is being created by devices at the edge of the Internet rather than from centralized systems. What does this mean for today's IT professional? In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists will addresses this very serious issue of profound change in the industry.
Business as usual for IT is evolving into a "Make or Buy" decision on a service-by-service conversation with input from the LOBs. How does your organization move forward with cloud? In his general session at 16th Cloud Expo, Paul Maravei, Regional Sales Manager, Hybrid Cloud and Managed Services at Cisco, discusses how Cisco and its partners offer a market-leading portfolio and ecosystem of cloud infrastructure and application services that allow you to uniquely and securely combine cloud business applications and services across multiple cloud delivery models.
In his General Session at 16th Cloud Expo, David Shacochis, host of The Hybrid IT Files podcast and Vice President at CenturyLink, investigated three key trends of the “gigabit economy" though the story of a Fortune 500 communications company in transformation. Narrating how multi-modal hybrid IT, service automation, and agile delivery all intersect, he will cover the role of storytelling and empathy in achieving strategic alignment between the enterprise and its information technology.
Buzzword alert: Microservices and IoT at a DevOps conference? What could possibly go wrong? In this Power Panel at DevOps Summit, moderated by Jason Bloomberg, the leading expert on architecting agility for the enterprise and president of Intellyx, panelists peeled away the buzz and discuss the important architectural principles behind implementing IoT solutions for the enterprise. As remote IoT devices and sensors become increasingly intelligent, they become part of our distributed cloud environment, and we must architect and code accordingly. At the very least, you'll have no problem fillin...
Growth hacking is common for startups to make unheard-of progress in building their business. Career Hacks can help Geek Girls and those who support them (yes, that's you too, Dad!) to excel in this typically male-dominated world. Get ready to learn the facts: Is there a bias against women in the tech / developer communities? Why are women 50% of the workforce, but hold only 24% of the STEM or IT positions? Some beginnings of what to do about it! In her Opening Keynote at 16th Cloud Expo, Sandy Carter, IBM General Manager Cloud Ecosystem and Developers, and a Social Business Evangelist, d...
Converging digital disruptions is creating a major sea change - Cisco calls this the Internet of Everything (IoE). IoE is the network connection of People, Process, Data and Things, fueled by Cloud, Mobile, Social, Analytics and Security, and it represents a $19Trillion value-at-stake over the next 10 years. In her keynote at @ThingsExpo, Manjula Talreja, VP of Cisco Consulting Services, discussed IoE and the enormous opportunities it provides to public and private firms alike. She will share what businesses must do to thrive in the IoE economy, citing examples from several industry sectors.
In his keynote at 16th Cloud Expo, Rodney Rogers, CEO of Virtustream, discussed the evolution of the company from inception to its recent acquisition by EMC – including personal insights, lessons learned (and some WTF moments) along the way. Learn how Virtustream’s unique approach of combining the economics and elasticity of the consumer cloud model with proper performance, application automation and security into a platform became a breakout success with enterprise customers and a natural fit for the EMC Federation.
SYS-CON Events announced today that the "Second Containers & Microservices Conference" will take place November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA, and the “Third Containers & Microservices Conference” will take place June 7-9, 2016, at Javits Center in New York City. Containers and microservices have become topics of intense interest throughout the cloud developer and enterprise IT communities.
SYS-CON Events announced today that the "First Containers & Microservices Conference" will take place June 9-11, 2015, at the Javits Center in New York City. The “Second Containers & Microservices Conference” will take place November 3-5, 2015, at Santa Clara Convention Center, Santa Clara, CA. Containers and microservices have become topics of intense interest throughout the cloud developer and enterprise IT communities.
With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo in Silicon Valley. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be! Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, is co-located with 17th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. The Internet of Things (IoT) is the most profound change in personal an...
17th Cloud Expo, taking place Nov 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry players in the world. Cloud computing is now being embraced by a majority of enterprises of all sizes. Yesterday's debate about public vs. private has transformed into the reality of hybrid cloud: a recent survey shows that 74% of enterprises have a hybrid cloud strategy. Meanwhile, 94% of enterprises are using some form of XaaS – software, platform, and infrastructure as a service.
The 17th International Cloud Expo has announced that its Call for Papers is open. 17th International Cloud Expo, to be held November 3-5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, brings together Cloud Computing, APM, APIs, Microservices, Security, Big Data, Internet of Things, DevOps and WebRTC to one location. With cloud computing driving a higher percentage of enterprise IT budgets every year, it becomes increasingly important to plant your flag in this fast-expanding business opportunity. Submit your speaking proposal today!